Jürgen Albrecht

TypeMale
Artist
Associated person(s)
URLsVimeo Skulpturen mit Kunst & Tageslicht (Documentation) by Jürgen Albrecht
Artist's page


Exhibitions
Solo exhibition2018Neue ArbeitenRaum 71, FleetinselHamburg (DE)
Group exhibition2014SCHEINWERFERKunstmuseum Celle mit Sammlung Robert SimonCelle (DE)
Group exhibition2012ARCHITEKTONIKANationalgalerie im Hamburger BahnhofBerlin (DE)
Group exhibition2011Weiß und andere FarbenHamburger KunsthalleHamburg (DE)
Solo exhibition1988Jürgen AlbrechtLaure Genillard GalleryLondon (GB)


Publications
Monography2009Verlag für moderne Kunst NürnbergEine Höhle für Platon - Kunstprojekt Villa Ingenohl978-3-941185-91-3Nuremberg (DE) Bonn Montag Stiftung Bildende Kunst


2019
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Places of work / studios

Hamburg, Germany

2019
2003
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Exhibitions

Nuremberg, Germany
Neues Museum Nürnberg, Lightsculpture „Instrument Nr.1"
LINK

2003
1993 - 1994
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Fundings and grants

Bonn, Germany
Working grant from the Art Fund Bonn

1993 - 1994
1979 - 1985
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Education

Hamburg, Germany
University of Fine Arts of Hamburg

1979 - 1985
1979
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Education

Munich, Germany
Academy of Fine Arts, Munich

1979
1979 - 1988
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Education

Hamburg, Germany
Studied philosophy, art history and musicology at the University of Hamburg

1979 - 1988
- 1954
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Born

Hamburg, Germany

- 1954

Jürgen Albrecht’s sculptures are characterised by a strong contrast between exterior and interior effect. The observer initially perceives them as spatial objects, whereby their austere geometric forms and simple pale grey outer surface have an almost ascetic impact. A completely different impression arises when the sculptures are opened up and one looks inside. The observer now sees a labyrinthine architecture which seems to be abstract yet at the same time awakens associations with perceived images of actual rooms. It becomes extremely difficult for the observer to assess the dimensions of the supposed corridors, outcrops and alcoves ‑ he imagines himself capable of entering the undefined room before his eyes or indeed that he is already
inside it.

Light and shadow play the central role in constructing and producing these complex interiors. The artist cuts out particular shapes from the outer surface of the sculptures and then covers these holes, first with synthetic film, then with a thin layer of paper so that only indirect light can enter from outside whilst at the same time these "top lights" are themselves invisible from the exterior. Depending on the external light situation the light-room inside changes as well.
One important aspect of Jürgen Albrecht’s work is the interaction between the observer and the work of art. Since the artist prefers to work using daylight his interiors are constantly changing, allowing the observer ever new sensory experiences. Only through a continued process of perception does he experience the internal architecture in all its facets. This intense involvement with light and space is also reflected in the video works. First, Jürgen Albrecht builds a cardboard structure which, like his sculptures, contains an architecturally constructed space. A video camera is securely attached to the front of the object. The artist takes this object, which he describes as an instrument and moves through a variety of rooms and landscapes and at different times of the day.
The coloured worlds arising from the incident daylight inside the instrument are recorded by the video camera and later projected onto a screen in the exhibition room. The viewer is presented with a multifaceted spectrum of images – he might see a room flooded with light and filled with warm colours, a sparsely lit section of a room, a two-dimensional constructive polyptych, or an abstract line drawing. The transitions between these heterogeneous images are sometimes flowing and sometimes abrupt.
Quite consciously, the artist does not manipulate the film material afterwards but presents the unfiltered recorded results. He does however exert his influence on the images taken inside by selecting and defining times of day, rooms, landscapes and the periods of time spent there. Whilst doing this, he also to a certain extent allows chance to play a part in shaping the images produced inside the cardboard object. The large projection format makes for a flowing transition between the real exhibition space and the filmed interior space as well ­ both appear as being of similar dimensions. Thus, the observer can readily imagine stepping into the filmic space. As in all Albrecht’s work, the reality of the work is linked directly to the principle of imagination. The decisive factor is not that which really exists but rather that which arises from it in the mind of the observer.

Jürgen Albrecht 

http://www.juergenalbrecht.com/kurztext.php (05.05.2019)

 

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ohne Titel photo ohne Titel 2012 Jürgen Albrecht 
Universalis photo Universalis 2013 Jürgen Albrecht